6 Ways to Improve Your Presentation Skills

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6 Ways to Improve Your Public Speaking Presentation Skills Whether you are an expert in public speaking or you've just started learning the ropes, being confident and accurate in your presentation skills does take time to develop. Here are six ways to improve your presentation skills when public speaking. #1. Be enthusiastic and passionate about your topic. If you don't truly believe in what you are saying or have not completely bought into the idea, how can you expect your audience to do so? You have to be relaxed and seriously passionate about whatever it is you're speaking on. If you're not quite there yet but you know that you still have to present the idea or the project, it's best to get to know the project on a more intimate basis until you feel confident and passionate about the ideas. Find what speaks to you in the presentation and it may also speak to your audience. It will also help connect your audience to the topic, ideas or project. #2. Be observant of your audience. If you notice audience members checking their watches, playing with their smart phones, yawning or gazing off into space, you've obviously lost them. This doesn't mean that you need to just finish out the presentation as quickly as possible; it means that you need to reengage your audience by asking questions, getting down off of the platform or podium, using large gestures, or pointing people out on how well they did on a certain project. If people know that they might get called on, they're more likely to stay alert. #3. Keep your message simple and to the point. If it takes you 10 minutes to get to the meat of your presentation, and people have no idea what you're talking about until you're at least 10 to 15 minutes in, you've already lost them. You don't need to make lengthy introductions or long, drawn out jokes or stories simply to break the ice. Concentrate on your core message and get to the point as quickly as possible. You can reiterate the main points at the end with important information tucked in throughout the middle of the presentation. #4. Smile and make eye contact with your audience. If you're staring at your page or your paperwork the entire time, you're going to lose your audience very quickly. Make sure you know your presentation inside and out. Remember, amateurs practice until they get it right; professionals practice until they can't get it wrong. If you're nervous about the presentation, this is all the more reason to practice, practice, practice and tell you know it inside and out. If you can walk around the room and still talk about your presentation, engage your audience and get them passionate about the idea, then you've got it. #5. Remember the 10 – 20 – 30 rule for slideshows. Guy Kowasaki from Apple suggests that a slideshow should contain no more than 10 slides; last no more than 20 minutes, and use a font no less than 30 point. If you stick to these simple rules you can engage your audience, get to the core message, and keep them entertained until the end. #6. Remember to be human. If you simply stand up there and present the message as a robot, memorization down perfectly, with no feeling or engagement, and are going to lose your audience very quickly. Not only should you remember the previous five points that also try to be human by telling stories and respond to certain stories personally. Ask questions, talk about an experience, or put the message into practical terms. Public speaking presentations don't have to be difficult but it does take practice. Practice in front of the mirror, consider videotaping yourself, and remember these six points to a successful presentation.

6 Ways to Improve Your Public Speaking Presentation Skills

Whether you are an expert in public speaking or you’ve just started learning the ropes, being confident and accurate in your presentation skills does take time to develop. Here are six ways to improve your presentation skills when public speaking.

#1. Be enthusiastic and passionate about your topic.6 Ways to Improve Your Public Speaking Presentation Skills  Whether you are an expert in public speaking or you've just started learning the ropes, being confident and accurate in your presentation skills does take time to develop. Here are six ways to improve your presentation skills when public speaking.  #1. Be enthusiastic and passionate about your topic.  If you don't truly believe in what you are saying or have not completely bought into the idea, how can you expect your audience to do so? You have to be relaxed and seriously passionate about whatever it is you're speaking on. If you're not quite there yet but you know that you still have to present the idea or the project, it's best to get to know the project on a more intimate basis until you feel confident and passionate about the ideas. Find what speaks to you in the presentation and it may also speak to your audience. It will also help connect your audience to the topic, ideas or project.  #2. Be observant of your audience.  If you notice audience members checking their watches, playing with their smart phones, yawning or gazing off into space, you've obviously lost them. This doesn't mean that you need to just finish out the presentation as quickly as possible; it means that you need to reengage your audience by asking questions, getting down off of the platform or podium, using large gestures, or pointing people out on how well they did on a certain project. If people know that they might get called on, they're more likely to stay alert.  #3. Keep your message simple and to the point.  If it takes you 10 minutes to get to the meat of your presentation, and people have no idea what you're talking about until you're at least 10 to 15 minutes in, you've already lost them. You don't need to make lengthy introductions or long, drawn out jokes or stories simply to break the ice. Concentrate on your core message and get to the point as quickly as possible. You can reiterate the main points at the end with important information tucked in throughout the middle of the presentation.  #4. Smile and make eye contact with your audience.  If you're staring at your page or your paperwork the entire time, you're going to lose your audience very quickly. Make sure you know your presentation inside and out. Remember, amateurs practice until they get it right; professionals practice until they can't get it wrong. If you're nervous about the presentation, this is all the more reason to practice, practice, practice and tell you know it inside and out. If you can walk around the room and still talk about your presentation, engage your audience and get them passionate about the idea, then you've got it.  #5. Remember the 10 – 20 – 30 rule for slideshows.  Guy Kowasaki from Apple suggests that a slideshow should contain no more than 10 slides; last no more than 20 minutes, and use a font no less than 30 point. If you stick to these simple rules you can engage your audience, get to the core message, and keep them entertained until the end.  #6. Remember to be human.  If you simply stand up there and present the message as a robot, memorization down perfectly, with no feeling or engagement, and are going to lose your audience very quickly. Not only should you remember the previous five points that also try to be human by telling stories and respond to certain stories personally. Ask questions, talk about an experience, or put the message into practical terms.  Public speaking presentations don't have to be difficult but it does take practice. Practice in front of the mirror, consider videotaping yourself, and remember these six points to a successful presentation.

If you don’t truly believe in what you are saying or have not completely bought into the idea, how can you expect your audience to do so? You have to be relaxed and seriously passionate about whatever it is you’re speaking on. If you’re not quite there yet but you know that you still have to present the idea or the project, it’s best to get to know the project on a more intimate basis until you feel confident and passionate about the ideas. Find what speaks to you in the presentation and it may also speak to your audience. It will also help connect your audience to the topic, ideas or project.

#2. Be observant of your audience.

If you notice audience members checking their watches, playing with their smart phones, yawning or gazing off into space, you’ve obviously lost them. This doesn’t mean that you need to just finish out the presentation as quickly as possible; it means that you need to reengage your audience by asking questions, getting down off of the platform or podium, using large gestures, or pointing people out on how well they did on a certain project. If people know that they might get called on, they’re more likely to stay alert.

#3. Keep your message simple and to the point.

If it takes you 10 minutes to get to the meat of your presentation, and people have no idea what you’re talking about until you’re at least 10 to 15 minutes in, you’ve already lost them. You don’t need to make lengthy introductions or long, drawn out jokes or stories simply to break the ice. Concentrate on your core message and get to the point as quickly as possible. You can reiterate the main points at the end with important information tucked in throughout the middle of the presentation.

#4. Smile and make eye contact with your audience.

If you’re staring at your page or your paperwork the entire time, you’re going to lose your audience very quickly. Make sure you know your presentation inside and out. Remember, amateurs practice until they get it right; professionals practice until they can’t get it wrong. If you’re nervous about the presentation, this is all the more reason to practice, practice, practice and tell you know it inside and out. If you can walk around the room and still talk about your presentation, engage your audience and get them passionate about the idea, then you’ve got it.

#5. Remember the 10 – 20 – 30 rule for slideshows.

Guy Kowasaki from Apple suggests that a slideshow should contain no more than 10 slides; last no more than 20 minutes, and use a font no less than 30 point. If you stick to these simple rules you can engage your audience, get to the core message, and keep them entertained until the end.

#6. Remember to be human.

If you simply stand up there and present the message as a robot, memorization down perfectly, with no feeling or engagement, and are going to lose your audience very quickly. Not only should you remember the previous five points that also try to be human by telling stories and respond to certain stories personally. Ask questions, talk about an experience, or put the message into practical terms.

Public speaking presentations don’t have to be difficult but it does take practice. Practice in front of the mirror, consider videotaping yourself, and remember these six points to a successful presentation.