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The Missing Connect With Your Presentation Skills

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Envision you are the most astounding figure skater who at any point lived. While practicing in a quiet, discharge arena, you show a definitive in physicality and appearance. You oppose the laws of gravity as you jump noticeable all around, arriving with perfect exactness. You turn with easy effortlessness and power; you execute bounces different skaters just dream about. On that ice, you are in your component, doing what you want to do and doing it flawlessly.

In practice, that is.

The following day, you enter a similar arena for the huge rivalry. When you investigate the stands, you see a huge number of eyeballs on you. As you start your program, you skate reluctantly, reluctantly. You discover moves you generally don’t need to consider. You overlook what comes next. You wobble and bobble and scarcely get past the program on your feet.

Presently, think about this: Your disappointed mentor barrels up to you and howls, “That is it! Starting now and into the foreseeable future, we’re burning through two additional hours daily in practice until the point when you get this privilege in rivalry!” Question: Will that strategy take care of the issue? Obviously not, on the grounds that the issue isn’t in the domain of the skating. (Keep in mind, you skated the program impeccably 24 hours back.) The issue is in the domain of the EYEBALLS. You can skate until the point that your feet tumble off, however until the point that you make peace with those eyeballs, you will keep on stumbling in the spotlight.

So It Is With Public Speaking

A great many people say, “One-on-one I’m fine. It’s just when I’m before a gathering that I get apprehensive.” If you can talk and use your presentation skills,certainly and plainly one-on-one, it implies you definitely know the substance and can pass on it well (like skating superbly in practice). The issue comes when a discourse mentor says, “alright, we will have you practice the discourse five more circumstances in the meeting space to ensure you take care of business when you exhibit before the Board.” Emphasizing the substance and conveyance has restricted esteem since it assaults the issue from the domain of the SPEAKING. In any case, where a great many people endure most is in the domain of the EYEBALLS. Indeed, will probably withstand the eyeballs on the off chance that you feel positive about your material, while using your presentation skills however the inconvenience will even now be there. Methods and contrivances (like “picture the gathering of people exposed” or “begin with a joke” or “take a gander at the back divider in case you’re excessively anxious, making it impossible to look”) won’t help either. These traps simply set up a boundary; they don’t take care of the issue.

So what is the appropriate response? Understand that the issue isn’t in your presentation skills ; it’s that you’re not used to being THE CENTER OF ATTENTION. You see those eyeballs and all of a sudden you’re pushed outside of your agreeable secrecy into the stunning acknowledgment that somebody is really focusing. You’re bashful far from the consideration, the exceptional vitality. Be that as it may, incidentally, the vitality in those eyeballs can invigorate and comfort you-once you let it in.

Indeed, eyeballs quite often have positive vitality behind them since audience members need you to succeed with your presentation skills  Regardless of whether you confront whiners in the group, you can check no less than a couple of positive eyeball vibes coming toward you. Absorb the positive vitality and send it pull out as honest to goodness warmth and worry for your audience members. Seeing that worry welcomes much more positive vitality, which keeps the cycle going.

The Remedy?

It might appear to be fantastic at first. Be that as it may, the best way to make peace with those eyeballs is to quit maintaining a strategic distance from them and investigate them. Search them out. Associate back with your own particular eyeballs and see what’s truly there. It takes rehearse, obviously. To begin, search out a positive setting, for example, a SPEAKING CIRCLE* or strong gathering of companions. Keep in mind that, you’re as of now a speaker. You’re simply not familiar with being a beneficiary of listening-an expertise that must be aced in the strange, wondrous, unnerving, energizing domain of eyeballs.

6 Ways to Improve Your Presentation Skills

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6 Ways to Improve Your Public Speaking Presentation Skills

Whether you are an expert in public speaking or you’ve just started learning the ropes, being confident and accurate in your presentation skills does take time to develop. Here are six ways to improve your presentation skills when public speaking.

#1. Be enthusiastic and passionate about your topic.6 Ways to Improve Your Public Speaking Presentation Skills  Whether you are an expert in public speaking or you've just started learning the ropes, being confident and accurate in your presentation skills does take time to develop. Here are six ways to improve your presentation skills when public speaking.  #1. Be enthusiastic and passionate about your topic.  If you don't truly believe in what you are saying or have not completely bought into the idea, how can you expect your audience to do so? You have to be relaxed and seriously passionate about whatever it is you're speaking on. If you're not quite there yet but you know that you still have to present the idea or the project, it's best to get to know the project on a more intimate basis until you feel confident and passionate about the ideas. Find what speaks to you in the presentation and it may also speak to your audience. It will also help connect your audience to the topic, ideas or project.  #2. Be observant of your audience.  If you notice audience members checking their watches, playing with their smart phones, yawning or gazing off into space, you've obviously lost them. This doesn't mean that you need to just finish out the presentation as quickly as possible; it means that you need to reengage your audience by asking questions, getting down off of the platform or podium, using large gestures, or pointing people out on how well they did on a certain project. If people know that they might get called on, they're more likely to stay alert.  #3. Keep your message simple and to the point.  If it takes you 10 minutes to get to the meat of your presentation, and people have no idea what you're talking about until you're at least 10 to 15 minutes in, you've already lost them. You don't need to make lengthy introductions or long, drawn out jokes or stories simply to break the ice. Concentrate on your core message and get to the point as quickly as possible. You can reiterate the main points at the end with important information tucked in throughout the middle of the presentation.  #4. Smile and make eye contact with your audience.  If you're staring at your page or your paperwork the entire time, you're going to lose your audience very quickly. Make sure you know your presentation inside and out. Remember, amateurs practice until they get it right; professionals practice until they can't get it wrong. If you're nervous about the presentation, this is all the more reason to practice, practice, practice and tell you know it inside and out. If you can walk around the room and still talk about your presentation, engage your audience and get them passionate about the idea, then you've got it.  #5. Remember the 10 – 20 – 30 rule for slideshows.  Guy Kowasaki from Apple suggests that a slideshow should contain no more than 10 slides; last no more than 20 minutes, and use a font no less than 30 point. If you stick to these simple rules you can engage your audience, get to the core message, and keep them entertained until the end.  #6. Remember to be human.  If you simply stand up there and present the message as a robot, memorization down perfectly, with no feeling or engagement, and are going to lose your audience very quickly. Not only should you remember the previous five points that also try to be human by telling stories and respond to certain stories personally. Ask questions, talk about an experience, or put the message into practical terms.  Public speaking presentations don't have to be difficult but it does take practice. Practice in front of the mirror, consider videotaping yourself, and remember these six points to a successful presentation.

If you don’t truly believe in what you are saying or have not completely bought into the idea, how can you expect your audience to do so? You have to be relaxed and seriously passionate about whatever it is you’re speaking on. If you’re not quite there yet but you know that you still have to present the idea or the project, it’s best to get to know the project on a more intimate basis until you feel confident and passionate about the ideas. Find what speaks to you in the presentation and it may also speak to your audience. It will also help connect your audience to the topic, ideas or project.

#2. Be observant of your audience.

If you notice audience members checking their watches, playing with their smart phones, yawning or gazing off into space, you’ve obviously lost them. This doesn’t mean that you need to just finish out the presentation as quickly as possible; it means that you need to reengage your audience by asking questions, getting down off of the platform or podium, using large gestures, or pointing people out on how well they did on a certain project. If people know that they might get called on, they’re more likely to stay alert.

#3. Keep your message simple and to the point.

If it takes you 10 minutes to get to the meat of your presentation, and people have no idea what you’re talking about until you’re at least 10 to 15 minutes in, you’ve already lost them. You don’t need to make lengthy introductions or long, drawn out jokes or stories simply to break the ice. Concentrate on your core message and get to the point as quickly as possible. You can reiterate the main points at the end with important information tucked in throughout the middle of the presentation.

#4. Smile and make eye contact with your audience.

If you’re staring at your page or your paperwork the entire time, you’re going to lose your audience very quickly. Make sure you know your presentation inside and out. Remember, amateurs practice until they get it right; professionals practice until they can’t get it wrong. If you’re nervous about the presentation, this is all the more reason to practice, practice, practice and tell you know it inside and out. If you can walk around the room and still talk about your presentation, engage your audience and get them passionate about the idea, then you’ve got it.

#5. Remember the 10 – 20 – 30 rule for slideshows.

Guy Kowasaki from Apple suggests that a slideshow should contain no more than 10 slides; last no more than 20 minutes, and use a font no less than 30 point. If you stick to these simple rules you can engage your audience, get to the core message, and keep them entertained until the end.

#6. Remember to be human.

If you simply stand up there and present the message as a robot, memorization down perfectly, with no feeling or engagement, and are going to lose your audience very quickly. Not only should you remember the previous five points that also try to be human by telling stories and respond to certain stories personally. Ask questions, talk about an experience, or put the message into practical terms.

Public speaking presentations don’t have to be difficult but it does take practice. Practice in front of the mirror, consider videotaping yourself, and remember these six points to a successful presentation.