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You Can’t Sell Your Audience Unless You Do This One Thing

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Most people think that just because they are speaking to a larger group of people when they are “on stage” both literally and figuratively that the audience will be sold when they are finished giving their presentation or speech. This type of thinking will definitely prove to be the fallacy that will kill any chance of you being an effective and persuasive speaker, but truly this is how most people think! For example once every quarter my church is looking to solicit members on their capitol campaign contributions so what they do is to have a representative or board member of the campaign come up to the podium during mass and make their plea to members to give. So all I see that they are doing here is making their presence in front of a captive audience with a little plea to contribute to fund that’s it! No hook, no story, no close!  Now of course they will get a god bit of donations by default but there was no selling whatsoever. Similarly I know that you have sat through many company presentations as have I where someone will come up to the front of the room with their power point, give their title and regurgitate their presentation to the audience thinking that just because they were captive in front of an audience for 10 to15 minutes that they sold the audience, NO this does not happen! The whole idea to pitching a presentation to a large group is to sell your idea, plan or cause right?

This failure of not being effective when you only have one shot is due to not having a well constructed presentation. So how can you be sure to make yourself an effective speaker in front of an audience? There is a very simple formula that if used properly will be able to capture then sell your audience successfully, notice I said CAPTURE then sell. Capture is the first step and this is the ability to be able to “hook” your audience at the beginning of the presentation of speech. A hook is what initially draws or baits the audience to listen for more to come or a hook is designed as a mechanism for a solution that the audience came to remedy or improve an issue they came to resolve. A good example would be a first line manager giving a presentation to upper management on productivity improvement. A insufficient hook would be “How we will Improve Productivity in 2018”  Good hook or title that would definitely get attention would be “How improving communication within your company will lead to Increased Productivity and decreased waste” I think that you would agree the latter opening of a presentation would get attention and have the audience “waiting for more”. The second thing is to make sure that you have three point of interest as an outline that you will be covering – once again these three points should be additional hooks with explanations of pure examples that will back up of substantiate your original title or hook. After you have sold the audience with your three points you will close and I mean close your audience by simply reiterating your three points and tying them back to the title for example you will say something like this “ so by Creating winning strategies among different  management styles , Improving communication between teams to streamline your processes and , properly utilizing each individuals team members strengths will lead for efficient production you will be able Improve Communication Within Your Company that will Lead to Increased Productivity and Decreased Waste.

If you want to be successful the next time you deliver your next presentation use this simple formula in order to actually “Sell not Tell” your audience for the outcome that you want.

 

 

How to Interview Well and Minimize Bad Hires

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It’s interesting that some candidates come off Impressive in the interview process then 90 days down the road their performance does not jibe with how they came off in the interview? Many individuals are very skilled at interviewing but turn out to be bad performers and visa/ versa.  I have been interviewing  candidates for sales positions recently  and have found some helpful tips to help vet the right candidates. The key here is to to sharpen your interviewing skills with the right interviewing preparation.The following are some of questions that can help you in your interview process.interview

  1. What did you initially find interesting about this job?

This question will help you determine if the the potential employee really cares about your company and understands the job. If the answer is detailed and reveals he has done research on your company and the role, you may have a good fit. If instead a candidate gives a generic answer that shows no comprehension of what your company does or what the position entails, he may just be desperate to find any job–and you don’t want to hire him.

2. Have you visited our website? What intrigued you about it?

Pay close attention to how detailed a candidate is when answering this question. If he seems caught off guard or stumbles through his responses without giving specifics about the website, chances are he probably didn’t do his research. If a candidate couldn’t bother to pull up your website once before the interview, chances are he’s not truly interested, detail oriented, or well prepared.

3. What salary do you need?

You’re not inviting a salary negotiation. You just want to know what salary the employee needs to cover his bills, what it takes to make salary the least of his concerns. This helps you take the focus away from money and lets him know that salary is not what’s important about what you have to offer–it’s the actual job that matters. Learn what the employee wants, and then direct the conversation back to the job itself.

4. How much money would you leave us for?

Present the candidate a hypothetical situation: He gets the job, with the exact salary he asked for, and loves everything about the company and position. Then, he gets a job offer from another company. How much money would he need to be offered–on top of the salary he requested–to take the other interview? This is hugely important, because a great candidate will say a job he loves is truly worth more than money (as long as it covers his expenses). A mediocre candidate will say double or triple the salary, and a bad candidate will say a dollar amount that’s less than double. You want to hire someone who doesn’t work just for money, someone for whom money isn’t a top priority if you take it off the table.

5. Has there ever been a time when your workday was over but your tasks weren’t finished? What did you do?

This question, will reveal if your candidate is truly a dedicated employee. A bad prospect will say he left the tasks until the next day; a great candidate will say the day isn’t done until the work is. You want someone who cares about helping your company, not someone who loses focus and skirts off at the very first opportunity.

6. How do you pick up the slack if a co-worker doesn’t finish a task?

Set up a scenario: Suppose the candidate is working on a project at 10 p.m. on a Friday and gets a call from an angry customer because someone on your team missed an important deadline. A great employee would take ownership of the task and do it himself. A mediocre one would write down the details and refer it to the co-worker, to be handled later. It’s important that an employee be able to take initiative–even if it means picking up the slack–for the good of the company.

  1. Can you solve this problem?

Set up a scenario: Suppose the candidate is working on a project at 10 p.m. on a Friday and gets a call from a customer who’s angry because someone on your team missed an important deadline. A great employee would take ownership of the task and do it himself. A mediocre one would write down the details and refer it to the co-worker, to be handled later. It’s important that an employee be able to take initiative–even if it means picking up the slack–for the good of the company.

Taking the time and thoughtful approach to interviewing your candidates will help you find the right personnel.

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How to be More Persuasive for a Successful Presentation

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The Purpose of a Good Presentation

PPT article

Most people who give their presentations will spend their time dispensing their information to their respective groups that may include bosses, work peers, committees, and customers and so on. The presenters will have the information pertinent to their subject of discussion and illustrate with power point or some other visual aids. They will do their best to convey their information to their audience and probably be glad to have gotten through with their act. The purpose of a presentation is to sell your audience and most individuals think that they will get their point across by just simply presenting the information. I’m sure that this information is all pertinent and well thought out, but in order to have a great impact on your audience you have to follow a formula. A successful presentation has to be persuasive just like a sales pitch and a lot of times that it what a presentation is all about – trying to convince your audience.

Giving a Winning Presentation

A persuasive presentation has to grab the audience right from the start and your title should do just that. The title of a presentation should be a solution for what the audience has come to listen. If you were giving a presentation on a new process that your team had developed that will save the company a lot of money in the manufacturing process but will require some initial expenditures that over time will recoup the initial costs you would probably create a title something like “A New Process Development that Will Reduce Our Manufacturing Cost for a Higher Profit Margin. This title will probably get the attention of the bottom liners right from the get go. Now that you have a great title you will need to develop three key points, why only three? , Because your audience will not be able to remember more than three points. Each one of your points should be a breakdown of the three most important things you will want to touch on and those key points should be in order as the first, second and third of importance. Each point should be substantiated with an example for instance to prove your points just like an attorney presents facts and evidence to a jury. The example should include a date, who was involved and what the outcome was. Do you see how this is working so far? We had the title that hooked our audience and then a logical flow of points that we are selling to the audience and backing them up with credibility. After we have given our last point we will then close by and only by going back through and reciting each point and only the points without anything else that will cause you to “oversell” and then reiterating the title. It will probably sound like this so by altering the current Fetzer valve , cutting down on machine waste, and reducing production time we will have “A New process Development that Will Reduce Our Manufacturing Cost for a Higher Profit Margin” Bam! You have just closed you audience!

Developing an attention getting title and backing it up with key points to substantiate your purpose will help you be more persuasive for a successful presentation.