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You Must Use These Three Components if You Want to Persuade Your Audience

The mission or plan of giving a presentation is to sell your audience. Just as in a sales call, you have a strategy which includes a fact finding (asking questions to provide the right solution)  presentation and a close to win your prospect’s business. The same goes for a presentation although for some unknown reason most people have the illusion that just because you are the focal point to your audience they will hang on every word that you say right? Wrong because somehow you did not sell them or solve the problem that they came into listen to how you were going to benefit their life or current business situation! So, let’ start from the beginning. First and foremost you will have to have a solution to the problem that they came in to listen for the remedy to make their job, life or what have you better. Since you do not have the luxury to ask the audience one on one what problem is and how are going to solve it you have to come up with a title to you presentation that presents a solution for all the attendees. Once you do that say” How you can improve your business process quickly and cut unnecessary costs in30days” Now that will get some attention! Then you will have to have three key components to your presentation that will back up your “ solution”

First is Ethos – Meaning credibility. You will have to come off as an expert in your presentation to validate to your audience that you are an authority. I was contracted to help promote regenerative medicine around the U.S. and Canada. After I delivered my seminars , folks in the audience would presume I was a medical professional because I know and delivered my material  like person from the medical field.

Second –Pathos – Appealing to one’s emotional needs. So you will need to evoke some emotional appeal from your audience like the car commercials or pharmaceutical commercials do like our safety features were proven to save many lives or our drugs will help you can play with your grandchildren again with no pain. These are examples that will convince the audience that they can connect with emotions that make them feel better when they use those products.

Third – Logos – This is appeal to the logic. This is when you bring in statistics or facts that are credible and show proof of product or service. Example 44 out of 50 people that have use out pharmaceutical product for COPD have noticed a 40 percent improvement in lung function or when our drivers were involved in head on crashes at 55mph there were no fatalities.

You can clearly see that using this formula or strategy when you deliver a presentation will certainly give you more persuasive power and give you a much greater chance to sell your audience.

Overcome Public Speaking Nervousness And Come Off As A Polished Professional

Not everybody and I mean most people no matter how articulate they are talking in a group, interacting in sales call, giving a monthly meeting can actually stand up and give an effective presentation to an audience without some trepidation.  I have given countless public speaking workshops and the percentage of people coming to the class or workshop get nervous when they stand up to even introduce themselves. I guess that is why they are in the public speaking workshop. There are many folks that come in and say they only need “This Portion “ of the workshop , but they soon find out that is not the case. Yes a lot of people that come into the workshop are high level professionals , but that does not necessarily mean they are top proficient presenters.  

So why do people that have so much confidence get choked up, tripped up, fall apart during their presentations in front of an audience? The key is simply just this – they are not familiar with presenting their material or do not feel that their material is strong enough, their problem is just this – they have not thought to put together a well honed , organized presentation. So the problem is not whether you are a confident person is a question of what kind of person you become when you give the presentation. I had the opportunity to work with an executive of a medical device company who was going to have to give a presentation to a group of potential investors for his product launch. As you can imagine he was going to have to be on point, thorough and very persuasive to get the investors to write a big check. He did not get where he was without confidence but his issue was that he was not confident with his presentation and after reading and tweaking a few things he felt very confident and comfortable to deliver the presentation successfully because he now understood it. . So what did I suggest to better make this presentation easier for him to deliver? For one thing the title of the presentation needs to be a solution that the audience came to hear about , you need to grab their attention immediately! For example instead of “Get Better Results from Your Employees”  your title should be “ How many Managers Got Better Results From their Employees by implementing Three Key Strategies” Now we have a solution right of the bat that the speaker feels confident with! The next step, and this sounds simple but many folks struggle with this. You need to come up with three key points to reinforce your title. The three key points would be worked out almost the same way as the title only they are going to support the title by an example , analogy or instance that the audience can understand of make the connection to. When I finished working out the presentation for the aforementioned CEO of the medical device company , he was so confident that he would nail his upcoming presentation for the potential investors and all that was imply done to give him confidence was to reengineer his thinking by reengineering his presentation.

It’s Ok to Suck at Public Speaking

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Whether it’s a presentation, a talk, or a wedding toast, stringing together words in front of a sea of faces is terrifying for a lot of people. Millions of people. Probably even you. And me. Definitely me. I hate public speaking.

It’s scary because you might screw it up and be humiliated in front of your audience, whether that’s 10 people or 10,000. It’s scary because, let’s face it, it’s contrived, artificial, and weird. And the big reason: It’s scary because most of us don’t do it enough to get comfortable with it. Practice makes a huge difference.

But here’s the thing: Mastering the art of public speaking is overrated. It’s such a rare event in most people’s careers that the only energy it deserves is indifference. It’s the waterskiing of human speech. If you’re good at it, great for you. But do you feel bad because you are mediocre at waterskiing? I don’t.

In most fields, you can have a successful career while almost never speaking in public. You can have a successful career speaking in public but not being very good at it. You can have a successful career while cowering in the corner, if you’re really, really good at other key aspects of your job.

So stop worrying about how much you suck at public speaking. Which, ironically, is exactly the kind of attitude that could help you get better at it.

Consider comedians. Note their general bearing: They don’t seem nervous, but they also don’t seem super excited. They seem like they’re hanging out with you in the kitchen at a party. TV reporters? They generally seem like they could take or leave an assignment. Auctioneers: Relatively chill, actually. They all seem like they’re just having a conversation — one in which they’re the only ones speaking, but, still, a conversation.

It’s not like we at Forge don’t have public speaking tips. We do! (Listed and linked below.) But honestly: Don’t give this too much of your energy. Treat it like just another chat. Because it is.

Use the “reappraisal” techniqueto channel the adrenaline you feel right before speaking.

Record your speech and critique it. A lot.

Use Dialectical Behavior Therapy to regulate your mood.

Remember that video chat is like your own mini TV show.

And I have a few tips myself. I know it’s not that easy just to be relaxed when giving a speech, so here are a few ways that have helped me seem lower-key than I actually feel:

Say something weird. There is nothing audiences love more than a non sequitur. Find a thing in the room that everyone is aware of, and say the thing you might say if you ran into a friend at a cocktail party. “How do you think you change a light that high up?” “What’s the dog looking at in that painting?” In fact, whatever question a Joe Pesci character might ask while making small talk in a Martin Scorsese movie, ask that. It’s not a joke. But a moment of surprise and delight puts people in a receptive state of mind.

Don’t give a TED Talk (Unless you’re actually giving a TED Talk). That is, don’t pepper your speech with supposedly-off-the-top-of-your-head-but-obviously-rehearsed stories and precisely timed hand gestures. That approach is good for TED. But people aren’t here for a TED talk. They’re here to see you do whatever they’re here to see you do.

Focus on only one person every few seconds as you’re speaking. When you lock eyes, imagine everyone else just not being there. (Switch from person to person, otherwise, one member of the audience is going to get really creeped out.) Treating your speech like a one-on-one conversation will help you emotionally connect to the people you’re speaking with. It will make you feel more relaxed. And then you might even start having fun.

Credit for article – Ross MCCammon Executive Editor, Forge/Medium and author of Works Well With Others https://bit.ly/2N1TWU6

How to Recover From a Broken Public Speaking Presentation

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You are giving a very important public speaking presentation to the board members and midway through something overwhelms you and you can’t for the life of you remember exactly where you were in the presentation. You are giving a sales pitch on a new product to one of your biggest customers and you just lost it and lost your train of thought right in the middle of a flowing sales presentation. Knowing how to recover from a broken public speaking presentation is a very important skill that you can develop, It’s just that no one wants to prepare for a failure that may occur because the last thing you want to think of is messing up during your presentation, so we just do not prepare believing that if we are thinking positive we may mess up. The reality is that we should be prepared for a failure during our performance.

Below are four methods that you can employ if something happens to interrupt your flowing presentation. If you practice and understand these remedies to recover from a broken presentation they can save you a lot of stress and embarrassment. So take a look at each of these and just how easily you can employ any of these public speaking tips to save rescue yourself from a broken presentation.

Method 1: Make It Look Planned

This is what Jack Elliot did by pausing, saying “This next part is so important that I need to read it to you”, consulting his notes, then starting up again. One key lesson here is that you should always have your notes easily accessible. I keep mine in my pocket as a safely blanket; I rarely need them, but having them there sure make me feel good.

Method 2: Paraphrase Your Previous Content

“You will have to excuse me, but I am so passionate about my topic that I sometimes get ahead of myself. Allow me to review my previous point.” Nine times out of ten, retracing your steps will help you find the path forward.

Method 3: Ask Your Audience A Thought Provoking Question

“What seems to be the most important point so far?” I feel that this technique would work better in a public speaking presentation that is highly interactive to begin with. However you can use this as a rhetorical question to either buy time with a long pause or to precede a review of your previous content (i.e. a lead-in to Method #2).

Method 4: Review Your Overall Speaking Purpose

Every speech should have a central theme – preferably encapsulated in a three to twelve word catchphrase. Repeating your theme is always welcome by your audience so a memory lapse is a reasonable time to throw it back out there.

In Conclusion, the idea here is to help you be able to think on your feet as well as being able to deliver a public speaking presentation. The best presenters and public speakers have the ability to adapt to their situations and be able to react in a professional manner as to not ”get rattled”. If you employ the above tips you will be able to confidently recover from a broken presentation.

 

http://www.selfgrowth.com/user/2734321/edit/articles

15 Body Language Secrets of Successful People

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Our bodies have a language of their own, and their words aren’t always kind. Your body language has likely become an integral part of who you are, to the point where you might not even think about it.

If that’s the case, it’s time to start, because you could be sabotaging your career.

TalentSmart has tested more than a million people and found that the upper echelons of top performance are filled with people who are high in emotional intelligence (90% of top performers, to be exact). These people know the power that unspoken signals have in communication and they monitor their own body language accordingly.

What follows are the 15 most common body language blunders that people make, and emotionally intelligent people are careful to avoid.

  1. Slouching is a sign of disrespect. It communicates that you’re bored and have no desire to be where you are. You would never tell your boss, “I don’t understand why I have to listen to you,” but if you slouch, you don’t have to—your body says it for you, loud and clear.

The brain is hardwired to equate power with the amount of space people take up. Standing up straight with your shoulders back is a power position. It maximizes the amount of space you fill. Slouching, on the other hand, is the result of collapsing your form—it takes up less space and projects less power.

Maintaining good posture commands respect and promotes engagement from both ends of the conversation.

  1. Exaggerated gestures can imply that you’re stretching the truth. Aim for small, controlled gestures to indicate leadership and confidence, and open gestures—like spreading your arms apart or showing the palms of your hands—to communicate that you have nothing to hide.
  2. Watching the clock while talking to someone is a clear sign of disrespect, impatience, and inflated ego. It sends the message that you have better things to do than talk to the person you’re with, and that you’re anxious to leave them.
  3. Turning yourself away from others, or not leaning into your conversation, portrays that you are unengaged, uninterested, uncomfortable, and perhaps even distrustful of the person speaking.

Try leaning in towards the person who is speaking and tilt your head slightly as you listen to them speak. This shows the person speaking that they have your complete focus and attention.

  1. Crossed arms—and crossed legs, to some degree—are physical barriers that suggest you’re not open to what the other person is saying. Even if you’re smiling or engaged in a pleasant conversation, the other person may get a nagging sense that you’re shutting him or her out.

Even if folding your arms feels comfortable, resist the urge to do so if you want people to see you as open-minded and interested in what they have to say.

  1. Inconsistency between your words and your facial expression causes people to sense that something isn’t right and they begin to suspect that you’re trying to deceive them, even if they don’t know exactly why or how.

For example, a nervous smile while rejecting an offer during a negotiation won’t help you get what you want; it will just make the other person feel uneasy about working with you because they’ll assume that you’re up to something.

  1. Exaggerated nodding signals anxiety about approval. People may perceive your heavy nods as an attempt to show you agree with or understand something that you actually don’t.

 

  1. Fidgeting with or fixing your hair signals that you’re anxious, over-energized, self-conscious, and distracted. People will perceive you as overly concerned with your physical appearance and not concerned enough with your career.
  2. Avoiding eye contact makes it look like you have something to hide, and that arouses suspicion. Lack of eye contact can also indicate a lack of confidence and interest, which you never want to communicate in a business setting.

Looking down as you talk makes it seem like you lack confidence or are self-conscious, causing your words to lose their effect. It’s especially important to keep your eyes level if you’re making complicated or important points.

Sustained eye contact, on the other hand, communicates confidence, leadership, strength, and intelligence. While it is possible to be engaged without direct, constant eye contact, complete negligence will clearly have negative effects on your professional relationships.

  1. Eye contact that’s too intense may be perceived as aggressive, or an attempt to dominate. On average, Americans hold eye contact for seven to ten seconds, longer when we’re listening than when we’re talking. The way we break contact sends a message, too. Glancing down communicates submission, while looking to the side projects confidence.
  2. Rolling your eyes is a fail-proof way to communicate lack of respect. Fortunately, while it may be a habit, it’s voluntary. You can control it, and it’s worth the effort.
  3. Scowling or having a generally unhappy expression sends the message that you’re upset by those around you, even if they have nothing to do with your mood. Scowls turn people away, as they feel judged.

Smiling, however, suggests that you’re open, trustworthy, confident, and friendly. MRI studies have shown that the human brain responds favorably to a person who’s smiling, and this leaves a lasting positive impression.

  1. Weak handshakes signal that you lack authority and confidence, while a handshake that is too strong could be perceived as an aggressive attempt at domination, which is just as bad. Adapt your handshake to each person and situation, but make sure it’s always firm.
  2. Clenched fists, much like crossed arms and legs, can signal that you’re not open to other people’s points. It can also make you look argumentative and defensive, which will make people nervous about interacting with you.
  3. Getting too close. If you stand too close to someone (nearer than one and a half feet), it signals that you have no respect for or understanding of personal space. This will make people very uncomfortable when they’re around you.

Bringing It All Together

Avoiding these body language blunders will help you form stronger relationships, both professionally and personally.

By Dr. Travis Bradberry