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How to Recover From a Broken Public Speaking Presentation

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You are giving a very important public speaking presentation to the board members and midway through something overwhelms you and you can’t for the life of you remember exactly where you were in the presentation. You are giving a sales pitch on a new product to one of your biggest customers and you just lost it and lost your train of thought right in the middle of a flowing sales presentation. Knowing how to recover from a broken public speaking presentation is a very important skill that you can develop, It’s just that no one wants to prepare for a failure that may occur because the last thing you want to think of is messing up during your presentation, so we just do not prepare believing that if we are thinking positive we may mess up. The reality is that we should be prepared for a failure during our performance.

Below are four methods that you can employ if something happens to interrupt your flowing presentation. If you practice and understand these remedies to recover from a broken presentation they can save you a lot of stress and embarrassment. So take a look at each of these and just how easily you can employ any of these public speaking tips to save rescue yourself from a broken presentation.

Method 1: Make It Look Planned

This is what Jack Elliot did by pausing, saying “This next part is so important that I need to read it to you”, consulting his notes, then starting up again. One key lesson here is that you should always have your notes easily accessible. I keep mine in my pocket as a safely blanket; I rarely need them, but having them there sure make me feel good.

Method 2: Paraphrase Your Previous Content

“You will have to excuse me, but I am so passionate about my topic that I sometimes get ahead of myself. Allow me to review my previous point.” Nine times out of ten, retracing your steps will help you find the path forward.

Method 3: Ask Your Audience A Thought Provoking Question

“What seems to be the most important point so far?” I feel that this technique would work better in a public speaking presentation that is highly interactive to begin with. However you can use this as a rhetorical question to either buy time with a long pause or to precede a review of your previous content (i.e. a lead-in to Method #2).

Method 4: Review Your Overall Speaking Purpose

Every speech should have a central theme – preferably encapsulated in a three to twelve word catchphrase. Repeating your theme is always welcome by your audience so a memory lapse is a reasonable time to throw it back out there.

In Conclusion, the idea here is to help you be able to think on your feet as well as being able to deliver a public speaking presentation. The best presenters and public speakers have the ability to adapt to their situations and be able to react in a professional manner as to not ”get rattled”. If you employ the above tips you will be able to confidently recover from a broken presentation.

 

http://www.selfgrowth.com/user/2734321/edit/articles

15 Body Language Secrets of Successful People

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Our bodies have a language of their own, and their words aren’t always kind. Your body language has likely become an integral part of who you are, to the point where you might not even think about it.

If that’s the case, it’s time to start, because you could be sabotaging your career.

TalentSmart has tested more than a million people and found that the upper echelons of top performance are filled with people who are high in emotional intelligence (90% of top performers, to be exact). These people know the power that unspoken signals have in communication and they monitor their own body language accordingly.

What follows are the 15 most common body language blunders that people make, and emotionally intelligent people are careful to avoid.

  1. Slouching is a sign of disrespect. It communicates that you’re bored and have no desire to be where you are. You would never tell your boss, “I don’t understand why I have to listen to you,” but if you slouch, you don’t have to—your body says it for you, loud and clear.

The brain is hardwired to equate power with the amount of space people take up. Standing up straight with your shoulders back is a power position. It maximizes the amount of space you fill. Slouching, on the other hand, is the result of collapsing your form—it takes up less space and projects less power.

Maintaining good posture commands respect and promotes engagement from both ends of the conversation.

  1. Exaggerated gestures can imply that you’re stretching the truth. Aim for small, controlled gestures to indicate leadership and confidence, and open gestures—like spreading your arms apart or showing the palms of your hands—to communicate that you have nothing to hide.
  2. Watching the clock while talking to someone is a clear sign of disrespect, impatience, and inflated ego. It sends the message that you have better things to do than talk to the person you’re with, and that you’re anxious to leave them.
  3. Turning yourself away from others, or not leaning into your conversation, portrays that you are unengaged, uninterested, uncomfortable, and perhaps even distrustful of the person speaking.

Try leaning in towards the person who is speaking and tilt your head slightly as you listen to them speak. This shows the person speaking that they have your complete focus and attention.

  1. Crossed arms—and crossed legs, to some degree—are physical barriers that suggest you’re not open to what the other person is saying. Even if you’re smiling or engaged in a pleasant conversation, the other person may get a nagging sense that you’re shutting him or her out.

Even if folding your arms feels comfortable, resist the urge to do so if you want people to see you as open-minded and interested in what they have to say.

  1. Inconsistency between your words and your facial expression causes people to sense that something isn’t right and they begin to suspect that you’re trying to deceive them, even if they don’t know exactly why or how.

For example, a nervous smile while rejecting an offer during a negotiation won’t help you get what you want; it will just make the other person feel uneasy about working with you because they’ll assume that you’re up to something.

  1. Exaggerated nodding signals anxiety about approval. People may perceive your heavy nods as an attempt to show you agree with or understand something that you actually don’t.

 

  1. Fidgeting with or fixing your hair signals that you’re anxious, over-energized, self-conscious, and distracted. People will perceive you as overly concerned with your physical appearance and not concerned enough with your career.
  2. Avoiding eye contact makes it look like you have something to hide, and that arouses suspicion. Lack of eye contact can also indicate a lack of confidence and interest, which you never want to communicate in a business setting.

Looking down as you talk makes it seem like you lack confidence or are self-conscious, causing your words to lose their effect. It’s especially important to keep your eyes level if you’re making complicated or important points.

Sustained eye contact, on the other hand, communicates confidence, leadership, strength, and intelligence. While it is possible to be engaged without direct, constant eye contact, complete negligence will clearly have negative effects on your professional relationships.

  1. Eye contact that’s too intense may be perceived as aggressive, or an attempt to dominate. On average, Americans hold eye contact for seven to ten seconds, longer when we’re listening than when we’re talking. The way we break contact sends a message, too. Glancing down communicates submission, while looking to the side projects confidence.
  2. Rolling your eyes is a fail-proof way to communicate lack of respect. Fortunately, while it may be a habit, it’s voluntary. You can control it, and it’s worth the effort.
  3. Scowling or having a generally unhappy expression sends the message that you’re upset by those around you, even if they have nothing to do with your mood. Scowls turn people away, as they feel judged.

Smiling, however, suggests that you’re open, trustworthy, confident, and friendly. MRI studies have shown that the human brain responds favorably to a person who’s smiling, and this leaves a lasting positive impression.

  1. Weak handshakes signal that you lack authority and confidence, while a handshake that is too strong could be perceived as an aggressive attempt at domination, which is just as bad. Adapt your handshake to each person and situation, but make sure it’s always firm.
  2. Clenched fists, much like crossed arms and legs, can signal that you’re not open to other people’s points. It can also make you look argumentative and defensive, which will make people nervous about interacting with you.
  3. Getting too close. If you stand too close to someone (nearer than one and a half feet), it signals that you have no respect for or understanding of personal space. This will make people very uncomfortable when they’re around you.

Bringing It All Together

Avoiding these body language blunders will help you form stronger relationships, both professionally and personally.

By Dr. Travis Bradberry

Using Visualization in Public Speaking

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How To improve Public Speaking Skills

Public Speaking isn’t for everyone, but with some public speaking training you can get better at it and go on to become an impressive speaker. If you run a business or hold a leadership position in an organization, chances are there will often be occasions where you need to take the stage and address a group of employees, a larger audience of stakeholders, or even clients. Thankfully, there are some methods like visualization that can help you make the right impression.

 

Public Speaking Exercises

Before you begin a visualization exercise, you need to clear your mind this will relieve your public speaking anxiety. Find a comfortable space and relax your body and mind in a quiet room. Breath deeply and then begin to picture what things will be like on the day you need to make that speech or presentation. Imagine yourself taking the stage, feel the excitement at sharing what you have prepared with your audience. Make an impactful beginning, designed to impress your listeners. Draw them in as you go on. Picture yourself walking calmly up and the feeling of success as you run through the speech. The key is to just think positive thoughts. It helps immensely to have a professional guide you through visualization for public speaking the first time you try it.

 

Know your audience

 

It always helps to know the who’s, what’s and whys of your speech. Who will your audience be? What do they want to learn from you today? Why should they keep listening to what you have to say? Give them reasons to pay attention, make their time spent worthwhile. Note that this isn’t restricted to the stage and speeches. These skills can stand you in good stead when you’re called on to make a public presentation as well. If it is a client presentation, know who you will be addressing. If you haven’t met them before, find out a bit more about them. It sometimes helps to see what they look like, so you will be talking to a familiar face. If it is a larger audience at a conference, find out the demographic mix so that your speech dwells on things that are of interest to them and skims over what they are already experts at or won’t be interested in. Picture what they might look like. Imagine the venue filled with people when you take the stage. Watch them hang on your every word. Feel the applause wash over you as you give them interesting bits of information or a solution to their business problems.

 

Training in Public Speaking

 

Professional public speaking skills training can help you overcome your fear of the stage and audiences. Public Speaking workshops can show you how to be a better speaker, how to overcome mid-speech crises and even how to weave your speech into an evocative story. Visualization is a valuable skill in the public speaker’s arsenal and going through public speaking training can help you get learn this technique and many others.

 

 

 

 

Be prepared

 

Run through your presentation or speech in your mind so that you have the confidence to deliver it without referencing your notes. But do keep some notes handy should you need them. Go through the steps of visualization a few times before D-day so that you are ready and raring to go. Engage the help of a trainer with the requisite credentials – like Leaders Speakers. If you have done your homework and put the skills learned in the training sessions into practice, you are likely to deliver a memorable presentation. Strike it lucky and you will get rave reviews!

 

Public Speaking Tips That Will Help You to be a Confident Speaker

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Have you ever wondered why some people seem to be so confident and poised when they deliver their presentations? Well the answer is that they were not naturally born with the innate ability to give great presentations without being nervous. The truth is that they were probably as nervous and anxious as anyone else, but they learned a few tricks to overcome their anxiety. The magic if you will is simply knowing a few key things about you and your audience. The helpful information below will show you how to improve public speaking skills using the free public speaking tips.

free public speaking tipsFirst of all most people experience public speaking fear before they appear in front of a large group and then some of the body symptoms start to happen, sweaty palms , nervous stomach, heart racing, dry mouth. These things are not noticeable to the audience. The nervous presenter gets even more uptight when these symptoms arise because they think the audience can see these things happening to them but the truth is that the audience cannot see 90 percent of any nervousness that is going on with you. The second and third public speaking tips are: DO NOT memorize your presentation or recite your presentation word for word. People think that if they do these aforementioned things that they cannot possibly screw up their presentation but the opposite is true. What generally happens is that the speaker will lose their place and back track or forget then stammer and stutter which will ruin an ordinarily smooth presentation. Showing up early to make sure that your room is set properly and ensuring that you equipment is working will take a lot of pressure of you at the beginning of your speech or presentation. You will want to eliminate as much pressure as you can.

Reducing your public speaking anxiety

public speaking tipsMost people that present have a fear of the audience. They think that the audience may not like their presentation or they just get plain intimated standing up in front of people. The trick here is to scan the audience to find friendly and receptive faces and focus on those folks from time to time as reassurance that your presentation is being well received. I remember when I first started in the business I was working for a national seminar company and my assigned topic was Social Media Marketing and it was just as new to me as it was to the audience. I knew that there were some attendees that probably knew more than me so as I delivered the seminar I focused on the attendees that looked most attentive that way it gave me the confidence that my information was being well received and validated my confidence. Another public speaking tip that is discounted is  taking a couple of deep breathes.If at any time during your presentation you feel yourself tightening up simply take a couple of deep breathes, this will bring more oxygen to the brain and actually relax your body.

 Public speaking tips that show confidence

Have you ever been at a seminar, presentation or speech in which the speaker was so energetic and full of energy that you found yourself energized? Well the more excited about your topic you are the more your audience will be also. So do not be afraid to show your enthusiasm when giving your presentation. Presenters look the most confident and poised with their hands down at their sides. This is not to say that you cannot bring your hands up to gesture because I highly recommend it to be descriptive purposes and for animation. You should never have your hands in front of you this sends a signal to the audience that that you are creating a barrier between you and them. Last but not least preparing for your presentation should be done with another person for a couple of key reasons. Another person can act as great feedback for your presentation or speech and they also serve as a bit of an audience for you. If you employ these public speaking techniques when delivering your next presentation you should be a lot less nervous and a lot more confident.